Pink pumpkin sales will aid breast cancer research

Debbie Hasty, a 9-year breast cancer survivor, accepts a pink Porcelain Doll pumpkin from Andrew Dixon at Grandaddy’s Farm. The Farm is grow-ing Porcelain Doll pumpkins to aid in breast cancer research. –Staff Photo by Kelly Lapczynski

STAFF WRITER

kelly lapczynski

 

Andrew Dixon decided to add a new color to his pumpkin patch this year.  Up to now, the pumpkins at Grandaddy’s Farm have been predictably orange.

This year, he thought, the patch needed some pink. This year, he would grow a pink hybrid pumpkin called Porcelain Doll to aid in breast cancer research.

“When I bought the seed, I signed a contract saying that I’d donate a 25 cents per Porcelain Doll pumpkin sold to the Pink Pumpkin Patch Foundation,” said Dixon. “But we have decided to give them all the proceeds from our pink pumpkin sales.”

“We’re a smaller grower,” said Dixon. “We have a smaller supply. We can’t compete with the bigger farms. But we can give back 100%.”

Debbie Hasty, a nine-year breast cancer survivor, accepts a pink Porcelain Doll pumpkin from Andrew Dixon at Grandaddy’s Farm. The Farm is growing Porcelain Doll pumpkins to aid in breast cancer research.

–Staff Photo by Kelly Lapczynski

The Pink Pumpkin Patch Foundation is, according to its website, a non-profit charity established in 2012 to “unite in the fight against breast cancer with a pink pumpkin on every porch.” The foundation promises to distribute funds collected from pink pumpkin sales to organizations involved in breast cancer research.

Dixon’s neighbor, Debbie Hasty, appreciates his effort.

When Hasty was hospitalized for surgery nine years ago, she didn’t expect a second diagnosis. “On the day I was supposed to be released, I found a lump. It was a big lump.”

Hasty, who had then been a nurse for nine years, was diagnosed with breast cancer. “I felt so stupid. I always told people to do self-tests, but I was lax on doing my own.”

Hasty worked as nurse for only one year more, before breast cancer left her sick and unable to work. “I miss it. I really loved it,” said Hasty.

Though breast cancer took her career, it did not take her life. And for that, she’s grateful.

“I thank Andrew and anyone involved in further research for breast cancer or any cancer,” said Hasty.

The Dixon family has been farming the 1165 Highland Ridge Road location since May 1951.

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